Recruiting young engineers? Traditional recruitment methods are broken…and there’s a better way!

Recruiting young engineers? Traditional recruitment methods are broken…and there’s a better way!

If your company is recruiting young engineers—in any domain, from mechanical to software to aerospace—you’re probably focusing on traditional recruitment methods. At enginehire, many clients come to us after posting their positions on job boards and hiring sites with little success. Those traditional routes are great options, if:

  • You have the time to sort through hundreds of irrelevant resumes from young engineers applying to any position that is even remotely relevant to their skill set.
  • You have the energy to cut through the noise and find the four or five candidates who are actually a fit for your position, really interested in your company, and worth interviewing.

If you’re like most of our clients, you’d answer “no” on both counts—you’re strapped for time, and you’re not interested in searching for the needles in the haystack.

Can job boards really be that bad when it comes to hiring young engineering talent? Job boards aren’t inherently evil, but:

  • They’re slow. You post your position, then anxiously check your inbox while waiting for qualified candidates to apply.
  • They’re a game of chance. You are essentially hoping that the right people will see your open position and apply for it, rather than thinking, “That sounds interesting, I should apply to that!” and then never coming back. Job boards let lots of great candidates fall through the cracks.
  • They favor big-name companies. How can you be sure that your dream candidates know about you and your position?

We also hear from a lot of companies relying on university career fairs. Perfect, right? Your young engineers are right there, with their resumes in hand. Except…

  • There are many universities across every province, and they all host multiple career fairs. You’re likely to burn out after attending just a few.
  • Your staff—who may already be overloaded—will have to block out the time to attend these fairs. You’ll have to pay to attend the event, and you’ll need marketing materials and table signs, not to mention the cost of your staff’s lost work time.
  • You’re likely to focus on one or two brand-name schools, which means you’re missing out. There are lots of high-quality candidates at lesser-known schools, and you need a way to connect with them.

Career fairs have another huge detractor: they favor young engineers who are willing to walk up to a random recruiter and sell themselves. And let’s face it: cold sales isn’t a major part of the engineering skill set. Lots of talented young engineers aren’t good at selling themselves, nor do they enjoy it. The career fair model heavily favors those who are more outgoing—which results in a superficial understanding of candidates and isn’t an accurate reflection of engineering skill.

Now, let’s look at the engineering job hunt from the candidate’s perspective. If you’re a young engineer with strong credentials, you’re likely to apply to companies you are familiar with. If you attend a recruitment event and see that a company like…let’s say Google…is there, with a big, bustling booth, free stuff with their logo on it, recruiters waiting to talk to you, and hey, an invitation to the happy hour they’re holding after the event, you’re immediately drawn in. Candidates want to work for the companies “everyone has heard of”, so smaller, lesser-known companies struggle to get a second look.

If you’re not Google, how do you get access to top-tier talent, when those young hotshots haven’t heard of your company and don’t know what you do? You’ve probably thought of:

  • LinkedIn InMails. Except lots of those go to people who may have already found a job or aren’t actively looking.
  • On-campus hiring. Except that you probably have year-round hiring needs, and on-campus hiring is very seasonal.
  • Posting your open positions online. Except that evaluating new graduates is very different from evaluating candidates with a decade of experience. Young engineers’ skills and passions are captured through things like teams, clubs, course work and side projects—and those are tough to evaluate without an intimate understanding of and expertise dealing with young engineers.

Sounds intimidating, right? Maybe…but that’s why you need us at enginehire on your side. We work exclusively with young engineers, and with engineering companies looking for young talent. We understand your requirements, and we use an algorithmic approach to connect you with targeted, qualified candidates—not just with any new graduate looking for any job. You need a better way to find young engineering talent, and we get it. We know that the right candidates for you are out there, and we’re here to help you connect with them.

It’s hiring re-engineered.

enginehire – hiring re-engineered.

1855 775 4473 | info@enginehire.ca

Recruiting young engineers? Traditional recruitment methods are broken…and there’s a better way!

If your company is recruiting young engineers—in any domain, from mechanical to software to aerospace—you’re probably focusing on traditional recruitment methods. At enginehire, many clients come to us after posting their positions on job boards and hiring sites with little success. Those traditional routes are great options, if:

  • You have the time to sort through hundreds of irrelevant resumes from young engineers applying to any position that is even remotely relevant to their skill set.
  • You have the energy to cut through the noise and find the four or five candidates who are actually a fit for your position, really interested in your company, and worth interviewing.

If you’re like most of our clients, you’d answer “no” on both counts—you’re strapped for time, and you’re not interested in searching for the needles in the haystack.

Can job boards really be that bad when it comes to hiring young engineering talent? Job boards aren’t inherently evil, but:

  • They’re slow. You post your position, then anxiously check your inbox while waiting for qualified candidates to apply.
  • They’re a game of chance. You are essentially hoping that the right people will see your open position and apply for it, rather than thinking, “That sounds interesting, I should apply to that!” and then never coming back. Job boards let lots of great candidates fall through the cracks.
  • They favor big-name companies. How can you be sure that your dream candidates know about you and your position?

We also hear from a lot of companies relying on university career fairs. Perfect, right? Your young engineers are right there, with their resumes in hand. Except…

  • There are many universities across every province, and they all host multiple career fairs. You’re likely to burn out after attending just a few.
  • Your staff—who may already be overloaded—will have to block out the time to attend these fairs. You’ll have to pay to attend the event, and you’ll need marketing materials and table signs, not to mention the cost of your staff’s lost work time.
  • You’re likely to focus on one or two brand-name schools, which means you’re missing out. There are lots of high-quality candidates at lesser-known schools, and you need a way to connect with them.

Career fairs have another huge detractor: they favor young engineers who are willing to walk up to a random recruiter and sell themselves. And let’s face it: cold sales isn’t a major part of the engineering skill set. Lots of talented young engineers aren’t good at selling themselves, nor do they enjoy it. The career fair model heavily favors those who are more outgoing—which results in a superficial understanding of candidates and isn’t an accurate reflection of engineering skill.

Now, let’s look at the engineering job hunt from the candidate’s perspective. If you’re a young engineer with strong credentials, you’re likely to apply to companies you are familiar with. If you attend a recruitment event and see that a company like…let’s say Google…is there, with a big, bustling booth, free stuff with their logo on it, recruiters waiting to talk to you, and hey, an invitation to the happy hour they’re holding after the event, you’re immediately drawn in. Candidates want to work for the companies “everyone has heard of”, so smaller, lesser-known companies struggle to get a second look.

If you’re not Google, how do you get access to top-tier talent, when those young hotshots haven’t heard of your company and don’t know what you do? You’ve probably thought of:

  • LinkedIn InMails. Except lots of those go to people who may have already found a job or aren’t actively looking.
  • On-campus hiring. Except that you probably have year-round hiring needs, and on-campus hiring is very seasonal.
  • Posting your open positions online. Except that evaluating new graduates is very different from evaluating candidates with a decade of experience. Young engineers’ skills and passions are captured through things like teams, clubs, course work and side projects—and those are tough to evaluate without an intimate understanding of and expertise dealing with young engineers.

Sounds intimidating, right? Maybe…but that’s why you need us at enginehire on your side. We work exclusively with young engineers, and with engineering companies looking for young talent. We understand your requirements, and we use an algorithmic approach to connect you with targeted, qualified candidates—not just with any new graduate looking for any job. You need a better way to find young engineering talent, and we get it. We know that the right candidates for you are out there, and we’re here to help you connect with them.

It’s hiring re-engineered.

enginehire – hiring re-engineered.

1855 775 4473 | info@enginehire.ca

Top